Debunking Silly Arguments Against Frugality

penny

(a set of persuasive arguments to pass along to your favorite spender.)

Introducing the finest anti-frugality arguments money can buy, and the reasons why they’re wrong:

1. Frugality is boring and restrictive. Where’s the fun in that?!

You’re just not getting it. Frugality is freedom from the cubicle, or free vacations in Aruba, or enough cash to buy a modest house outright. What’s restrictive about that?

Frugality can be thrilling. After all, it’s the art of getting more for less, and requires research, knowledge, negotiation skills, and a level head. If you like an ongoing challenge, and rebelling against the status quo, then frugality is anything but boring.

If your definition of fun absolutely requires large sums of cash, you’re the problem, not frugality.

2. I earn the money and I should get to buy what I want, when I want it.

Great! But did you know that delaying consumption (aka not getting what you want when you want it, but rather waiting a while until you get it) increases happiness? Delayed gratification is like free happiness. You get the thrill of the anticipation as well as thing you want.

Not to mention, you sound righteously entitled.

3. Being frugal makes me feel poor.

Oh no no no. If this is your anti-frugality argument, it’s so weak. Answer me this, is it worse to feel poor or to actually be poor? Because if you continue to consume, you’ll probably be poor.

Did you know that many of the richest people in the world practice frugality on a daily basis? That’s why they are wealthy…

Don’t believe me? Well, that’s what the book The Millionaire Next Door is all about. Read it. I promise you will never be the same. 

4. Being frugal is too much work.

And your point is…?

Ok, I’ll give it to you, it’s a little extra work to always hunt down the deal. But that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t do it. You know how the saying goes – if it’s not difficult, it probably isn’t worth it.

Besides, frugality is only hard at first. Then you get used to it, your lifestyle changes, and frugality becomes habit. You learn to love it in the end.

5. Being frugal won’t increase my income. Making more money is easier than pinching every penny.

Why does this have to be an either/or situation? Wouldn’t it be best to make more money and also be frugal with how you spend it?

You’ve hit on a key concept in personal finance.

Most people who make more money just spend more money. That’s called lifestyle inflation, and it’s the reason that many who earn a high wage have a net worth in the red.

If you make more money and save more money, then your savings rate goes up. This translates into having more money to get out of debt, build wealth, become financially free, and eventually live your dreams.

And let’s be honest, dreams take money. Depending on the dream, it could be a lot of money. If it does, your chances of actualizing that dream are a lot slimmer if you spend every cent you make.

6. What’s the point in saving all that money if you never enjoy it? Why would you choose to die with tons of money without ever living your life?

Hey kid, do your homework. The goal of frugality is not to see how much money you can penny pinch into oblivion. The goal is to  be free from the oppression of debt and to have the freedom to do the things you really want to do in life.

Want to quit your job? Frugality is your way out. Want to travel the world? Frugality is your ticket. By consciously saving where you can, you can actully have the freedom to enjoy the things you really want in life.

So, in essence, by being frugal and eventually financially free, you could actually live more of the life you crave than if your finances are controlling your so-called life.

7. I don’t want to miss out on fun with my friends and family.

You don’t have to. The power play when it comes to friends and family is to suggest frugal alternatives, like potlucks instead of restaurants, Netflix instead of movie premiers, and frisbee in the park instead of bowling.

You’re real friends will stick around, and your family, well, they’re not going anywhere.

Debunked!

If your anti-frugal, those must have stung a little. But, you know, the truth always does. Are there any other arguments that you’ve debunked? Let me know with a comment.

If you’ve already joined the bright side of frugal, where the cash is always greener, pass this along to the doubting Thomases in your life.

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